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Du Mont went off the air in 1956; some former affiliates became key stations in News Corp.'s Fox network, launched in the '80s.

Mutual, a radio network (absorbed by CNN Radio in 1999), never got its TV network up and running.

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Ad Age produced a three-part series on Procter & Gamble. TV People Wonder Which Will Be TV's Capital." A year later, CBS opened CBS Television City, a TV studio in Los Angeles that operates to this day.

It was the nation's largest advertiser (.5 million in 1949 U. ad spending, equivalent to 5 million in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) and now (.7 billion in 2009 measured media, according to WPP's Kantar Media). Rosser Reeves, developer of the "Unique Selling Proposition" at Ted Bates, created the "Eisenhower Answers America" TV campaign for Dwight Eisenhower's winning presidential campaign.

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It rolled out filtered cigarettes, which many consumers perceived to be safer than nonfiltered smokes.

See internal documents from Hill & Knowlton and tobacco industry. (TV didn't displace newspapers as the nation's largest ad medium until 1994.) TV household penetration passed the halfway point in 1954, with TVs in 55% of U. Philip Morris had sold Marlboro since 1924 as, Burnett wrote, a nonfilter "fancy smoke for dudes and women." New Marlboro would be a filter smoke for the masses.

Burnett noted filter-cigarette sales had tripled "in a year marked by widespread publicity on the possible harmful effects of cigarette smoking." He wrote: "You say to yourself: 'Hmmm, people are afraid smoking cigarettes may harm them.

And the industry created a PR smokescreen: Cigarette makers hired Hill & Knowlton and formed the Tobacco Industry Research Committee, initially housed in the public-relations agency's office.

The committee in January 1954 ran a newspaper ad disputing "a theory that cigaret smoking is in some way linked with lung cancer." Hill & Knowlton continued on the tobacco industry's payroll for decades to come. Philip Morris hired adman Leo Burnett in late 1954 to relaunch Marlboro in 1955.

It rolled out filtered cigarettes, which many consumers perceived to be safer than nonfiltered smokes.

See internal documents from Hill & Knowlton and tobacco industry. (TV didn't displace newspapers as the nation's largest ad medium until 1994.) TV household penetration passed the halfway point in 1954, with TVs in 55% of U. Philip Morris had sold Marlboro since 1924 as, Burnett wrote, a nonfilter "fancy smoke for dudes and women." New Marlboro would be a filter smoke for the masses.

Burnett noted filter-cigarette sales had tripled "in a year marked by widespread publicity on the possible harmful effects of cigarette smoking." He wrote: "You say to yourself: 'Hmmm, people are afraid smoking cigarettes may harm them.

And the industry created a PR smokescreen: Cigarette makers hired Hill & Knowlton and formed the Tobacco Industry Research Committee, initially housed in the public-relations agency's office.

The committee in January 1954 ran a newspaper ad disputing "a theory that cigaret smoking is in some way linked with lung cancer." Hill & Knowlton continued on the tobacco industry's payroll for decades to come. Philip Morris hired adman Leo Burnett in late 1954 to relaunch Marlboro in 1955.

Gallup left Y&R in 1947 to focus on advertising research and political polling. RCA demonstrated television at the New York World's Fair, broadcasting President Franklin D. "Television is Here," said the headline on Ad Age's editorial. The magazine wrote: "Advertising will play a great part in the war effort -- in stimulating enlistments, in getting greater distribution of war bonds and savings stamps and in building and maintaining civilian morale."Formation of the War Advertising Council.